Nossen Residential Complex

Date: 2014

Location: Nossen, Berlin

Site Area: 4000 m2

Built Area: 3000 m2

This Project is Designed in cooperation with Atelier Barzeh.

Iranian client of the project wanted to build an autonomous residential complex in Germany by focusing on elder people. The land was located in Nossen region in the suburbs of Berlin; i.e. uniform contexture of old buildings with mostly sloping crossover ceilings and massive facades. One of these buildings at highest point of project’s sloping ground was completely dominant in design.
According to residential use of the complex, presence of the elderly, contexture of the area and so on, we preferred avoiding design of the complex in the form a building and approaching a neighborhood instead. It ultimately led to intermediate quality.
For this purpose, we thought of the following approaches:
- Pay attention to slope of the ground in design.
- Scattered structure
- Observance of hierarchy; public... semi-public... semi-private... private.
- Ownership on semi-private open spaces
- Delay in entering private close space
- Neighborhood units
- Facing windows
- Shared walls
- Open, semi-open and closed collective spaces
- Alley and square
- . . . In order to regenerate memorable hierarchy of “neighborhood... alley... square... house” and replace “building... elevator... lobby... unit”.
We inspired from region contexture to form the ceiling of the complex and unification of dispersed components.

This Project is Designed in cooperation with Atelier Barzeh.

Iranian client of the project wanted to build an autonomous residential complex in Germany by focusing on elder people. The land was located in Nossen region in the suburbs of Berlin; i.e. uniform contexture of old buildings with mostly sloping crossover ceilings and massive facades. One of these buildings at highest point of project’s sloping ground was completely dominant in design.
According to residential use of the complex, presence of the elderly, contexture of the area and so on, we preferred avoiding design of the complex in the form a building and approaching a neighborhood instead. It ultimately led to intermediate quality.
For this purpose, we thought of the following approaches:
- Pay attention to slope of the ground in design.
- Scattered structure
- Observance of hierarchy; public... semi-public... semi-private... private.
- Ownership on semi-private open spaces
- Delay in entering private close space
- Neighborhood units
- Facing windows
- Shared walls
- Open, semi-open and closed collective spaces
- Alley and square
- . . . In order to regenerate memorable hierarchy of “neighborhood... alley... square... house” and replace “building... elevator... lobby... unit”.
We inspired from region contexture to form the ceiling of the complex and unification of dispersed components.